All posts tagged: latest

This is why I write

Some useless dude once told me I should give up on writing. “You really should stop,” he said. “What’s the point? There’s no money in writing.” As if I didn’t know. As if I had spent my youthyears toiling away thinking I was going to be the next JK Rowling. As if money is the only reason we do anything. I suffer no delusions, trust me. I’ve always known what I’m getting myself in for. Authors make a pitiful amount of money and it’s only getting worse, yet here I am, still fighting for my place on the shelf. This is what a lot of non-writer people don’t understand about my (stellar) choice of career. They’re either under the impression that publishing is a lucrative career option (it’s not), or they think I’m a fucking idiot. Because why oh why would anyone work so hard if they’re not going to be paid for it? I’m no stranger to reward-free work. I’m surprised I stayed in school as long as I did, for the amount of …

Goodreads and my many emotions

#TYVOT has officially landed. Well, on Goodreads at least! It’s finally listed, in all of its semi-finished glory, a beautiful statement in the Goodreads database. It all feels so real. After so many years of working, of dreaming, my novel is coming to life. Publication is coming (on Nov 1st 2018, if I can afford everything in time!) When I saw my book up there, and by extension my swanky new Goodreads author profile, I did have myself quite the moment. Not only did I feel the excitement but I felt validated for the first time. I have always felt more comfortable calling myself a writer, as opposed to an author. But now I’m feeling like I should be owning that title, because hell yeah I’m an author and I worked damn hard to be able to call myself that.

Review: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

“Everyone in Shaker Heights was talking about it that summer: how Isabelle, the last of the Richardson children, had finally gone around the bend and burned the house down.” Celeste Ng’s second novel is the kind of contemporary fiction you can enjoy even if you’re not a regular reader of the genre, it seems. A close-knit family tale with secrets and the theme of love at the center, Little Fires Everywhere is an enticing read with fiercely real characters and a poignant plot. Shaker Heights is a nice, law-abiding American suburb. At the heart of it is Elena Richardson, journalist and mother of four, whose placid and rule-following nature mirrors the novel’s setting. She’s the type of person who does everything she is supposed to, and her distaste for those who don’t is palpable. She’s an interesting person to follow, especially when Mia Warren and her illegitimate daughter Pearl rock up into the neighborhood and rent a small apartment from the Richardsons. The lives of the two families cannot help but intertwine, pleasantly at first, but it …

How A Novel Is Edited

Step 1: Sit down at desk. You spent £150 on this desk and assembled it yourself. You bloody well should use it productively. Step 2: A clean work space is a productive work space. Tidy away clutter and select a scented candle for today’s activities. Meticulously groom your writing playlist on iTunes while you’re at it. Step 3: You’ve forgotten your cup of tea. Make one. Debate for 2 mins whether or not to bring biscuits back with you too. Step 4: Document your hilarious lack of progress so far on Twitter. #amwriting / #amediting Step 5: Open up your manuscript. Feel guilty about how long it’s been since you’ve looked at it. It may be a .doc file but you feel compelled to literally blow the dust and cobwebs off it. Step 6: Tell Twitter this. #amwriting / #amediting