All posts tagged: book review

Review: Brave by Rose McGowan

I’ve always enjoyed Rose McGowan for the fiery individual she appeared to be on screen. Even though she states in her memoir, “for those who knew me as an actress, I must inform you I was never that person”, she’s still a damn queen, I know it. Her fire comes across from the very first page. Her words are fierce, they demand attention, and damn right. For a survivor of abuse to come forward and tell her story, I would expect nothing less. “I was told I had to have long hair, otherwise the men doing the hiring in Hollywood wouldn’t want to fuck me, and if they didn’t want to fuck me, they wouldn’t hire me. I was told this by my female agent, which is tragic on so many levels.” Brave is less of a memoir, more of a social commentary with McGowan’s own experiences as the starting point. It’s a story about women and the abuse of women; it’s a painful and, yes, fairly triggering account, but it’s the kind of book …

Review: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

“Life in the bush is hard work, but you can’t beat the taste of salmon you caught in the morning, drizzled with butter you churned from your own fresh cream. Up here, there’s no one to tell you what to do or how to do it. We each survive our own way. If you’re tough enough, it’s heaven on earth.” This little slice of magic really did tick my boxes. Survivalism against a glorious Alaskan backdrop with intense family drama and characters that made the heart melt? I am all over that. Kristin Hannah is best known for her award-winning WWII family drama The Nightingale, a book that still lingers on my to-read pile but not for much longer. Perhaps those who enjoyed The Nightingale for its family dynamics in a high-stakes setting will also find appeal in The Great Alone. It’s hard-core, it’s emotional and it’s exciting. But most of all its core character drama packs an immense punch and I do not say that lightly. I can count on one hand the number …

My Top Reads of 2017

5. Dusk or Dark or Dawn or Day by Seanan McGuirre Though I had certain difficulties with suspension of belief at times, this was a thoroughly enjoyable novel. I’ve grown to really enjoy Seanan McGuire; her novel concepts are stellar, though her execution sometimes falls a bit short (as in the case of Every Heart a Doorway). I was excited to pick up her latest novella, a speculative take on ghosts and the concept of the Afterlife. Would recommend for some enjoyable afternoon reading, especially if you’re a fan of original supernatural concepts. vvvv vvvv vvvv vvvv vvvv 4. Northern Lights by Philip Pullman I read the trilogy when I was very young and I never remembered much about it, except that I liked it but not that much. In preparation for the sequel trilogy, I decided it was high time I revisited the series. I definitely found Northern Lights inspiring, original and enjoyable. Lyra is a brilliant protagonist and I’m looking forward to getting into the rest of the series – I have next to no memory …

Review: The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert

I like a grim(m) fairy-tale retelling as much as the next person, and a dark, modern re-imagining of Alice in Wonderland sounds fab, does it not? And yes, for the first third of The Hazel Wood, I was excited. Engrossed, even. The premise is mysterious and enticing: Alice, our teenage protagonist, has been moving from place to place her entire life, her mum her only constant. She’s never really known why her mum keeps packing them off different places, but best she can tell it’s to escape the vicious “bad luck” they can’t help but encounter. “But I still saw the shadow of the bad luck: a woman who trailed me through a used bookstore, whispered something obscene in my ear as she picked my phone from my pocket. Streetlights winking out over my head, one by one, as I walked down the street after midnight. The same busker showing up with his guitar on every train I rode for a week, singing “Go Ask Alice” in his spooky tenor.” There’s something creepy about the …

Review: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

“Everyone in Shaker Heights was talking about it that summer: how Isabelle, the last of the Richardson children, had finally gone around the bend and burned the house down.” Celeste Ng’s second novel is the kind of contemporary fiction you can enjoy even if you’re not a regular reader of the genre, it seems. A close-knit family tale with secrets and the theme of love at the center, Little Fires Everywhere is an enticing read with fiercely real characters and a poignant plot. Shaker Heights is a nice, law-abiding American suburb. At the heart of it is Elena Richardson, journalist and mother of four, whose placid and rule-following nature mirrors the novel’s setting. She’s the type of person who does everything she is supposed to, and her distaste for those who don’t is palpable. She’s an interesting person to follow, especially when Mia Warren and her illegitimate daughter Pearl rock up into the neighborhood and rent a small apartment from the Richardsons. The lives of the two families cannot help but intertwine, pleasantly at first, but it …